Seal of Princeton University, The,

Seal of Princeton University, The, which is in the custody of the Secretary of the University, is in effect the corporate signature of the trustees. It is embossed on diplomas and printed on other official documents authorized by them and affixed by the secretary to legal instruments requiring its use.

The seal of the College of New Jersey, used for almost a century and a half, comprised the following details: In the upper part of a circle, an open Bible with Latin characters VET NOV TESTAMENTUM signifying the Old and New Testaments. Over the Bible, the motto VITAM MORTUIS REDDO (I restore life to the dead.) Underneath, on the right, a table with books signifying scholarship. On the left, a diploma, signifying the goal of the student. On the outside of the circle, SIGILLUM COLLEGII NEO-CAESARIENSIS IN AMERICA (seal of the College of New Jersey in America).

??????????????(ILLUS. OF THE SEAL FOLLOWS IN BOOK) Since 1896, when at the Sesquicentennial of its founding the College of New Jersey became Princeton University, the corporate seal has been simpler -- as described in the trustees' minutes of February 13, 1896: . . . a shield resting upon a circle. In the upper part of the shield an open Bible with Latin characters VET NOV TESTAMENTUM signifying the Old and New Testaments . . . In the lower part a chevron, denoting the rafters of a building. In the spaces between the sides of the shield and the circle the motto DEI SUB NUMINE VIGET [Under God's power she flourishes]. On the outside of the circle SIGILLUM UNIVERSITATIS PRINCETONIENSIS [seal of Princeton University].

??????(ILLUSTRATION OF SEAL IN BOOK) The shield from the official seal, minus the circle and with the motto in a ribbon beneath the shield, serves as the University's insignia and may be employed for decorative purposes by any organization or individual connected with the University where the use of Princeton's symbol is appropriate.

?????????(ILLUSTRATION OF SEAL IN BOOK) The full seal is strictly reserved for the purpose described in the college's original charter namely as ``a Common Seal under which they [the trustees] may pass all Diplomas, or Certificates of Degrees, and all Other the Affairs & Business of and Concerning the said Corporation. . . .''


From Alexander Leitch, A Princeton Companion, copyright Princeton University Press (1978).

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